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The world’s longest subsea cable will send clean energy from Morocco to the UK

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A 10.5 gigawatt (GW) solar and wind farm will be built in Morocco’s Guelmim-Oued Noun region, and it will supply the UK with clean energy via subsea cables. The twin 1.8 GW high voltage direct current (HVDC) subsea cables will be the world’s longest.

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The post The world’s longest subsea cable will send clean energy from Morocco to the UK appeared first on Electrek.

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zipcube
56 minutes ago
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Tesla is being sued by police officers injured after drunk Model X driver crashed into them on Autopilot

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Tesla is named as a defendant in a lawsuit by five police officers who suffered injuries after a Model X on Autopilot crashed into them during a traffic stop.

While Autopilot is being blamed, the officers are also suing a restaurant that reportedly overserved the driver.

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The post Tesla is being sued by police officers injured after drunk Model X driver crashed into them on Autopilot appeared first on Electrek.

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zipcube
1 hour ago
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New Azure Active Directory password brute-forcing flaw has no fix

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New Azure Active Directory password brute-forcing flaw has no fix

Enlarge (credit: Michael Dziedzic)

Imagine having unlimited attempts to guess someone's username and password without getting caught. That would make an ideal scenario for a stealthy threat actor—leaving server admins with little to no visibility into the attacker's actions, let alone the possibility of blocking them.

A newly discovered bug in Microsoft Azure's Active Directory (AD) implementation allows just that: single-factor brute-forcing of a user's AD credentials. And, these attempts aren't logged on to the server.

Invalid password, try again, and again...

In June this year, researchers at Secureworks Counter Threat Unit (CTU) discovered a flaw in the protocol used by Azure Active Directory Seamless Single Sign-On service.

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zipcube
1 hour ago
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To the mountain and back: Rivian’s electric truck and its 314-mile range

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BRECKENRIDGE, Colo.—Hats off to Rivian. Until 2018, almost no one had heard of the company. Now, it has brought the first battery electric pickup truck to market ahead of electric vehicle giant Tesla and just-plain-giant Ford, and this vehicle is aimed at a distinct buyer when compared to the everyman F-150 Lightning or the Mars colonist's Cybertruck. The $67,500 R1T is for people who like exploring the outdoors—this is an adventure truck. And to put that claim to the test, last week we drove one up a mountain and back.

Rivian got started in 2009 and toyed with the idea of a number of different vehicles until it settled on a pair of battery electric vehicles—a truck and SUV—to begin with. Both were to be built in a former Mitsubishi factory in Normal, Illinois, that the company bought in 2017. The following year, the company emerged from "stealth mode," and in 2019, I got to check out the concept R1T at that year's New York auto show, where it pushed all the right buttons.

The company also started raising billions of dollars from investors like Ford and Amazon, the latter also placing an order for 100,000 electric delivery trucks. Production of the R1T was originally slated to begin in 2020, but as with so many plans, that went out the window in March of that year. But the trucks are beginning to roll out of Rivian's Normal factory and into the hands of customers who ordered the (now sold-out) $73,000 Launch Edition.

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zipcube
3 hours ago
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Verizon will be the first customer for BrightDrop’s new electric van

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In January, General Motors created a new electric vehicle brand. It's called BrightDrop, and like GM's legacy brands that are electrifying, it, too, will use the company's forthcoming Ultium batteries and Ultium Drive electric motors. Unlike the rest of GM's brands, this one is aimed squarely at the fleet market. At the time, GM CEO Mary Barra revealed that Fedex would be BrightDrop's first customer. On Tuesday, BrightDrop announced that Verizon will also start using the electric vans.

In fact, Verizon will use a second BrightDrop vehicle, called the EV410. This uses the same battery pack and motor as the EV600 that we saw in FedEx colors at the start of the year. It will also offer the same 250-mile (402 km) range and come with the same package of safety systems. The biggest difference is the size and the amount of cargo each can carry; the EV410 is shorter overall than the EV600 and can carry 410 cubic feet (11,610 L) versus the bigger van's 600 cubic feet (16,990 L).

Meanwhile, BrightDrop is completing the first production EV600s, which are destined to start work for Fedex this holiday season. BrightDrop has contracted out the initial low-volume manufacturing to an unnamed supplier in Michigan while it refits GM's CAMI Assembly Plant in Ingersoll, Canada. EV600 production at CAMI is scheduled for late 2022, but Verizon has a longer wait on its hands—EV410 production won't begin until the following year.

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zipcube
3 hours ago
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Examining btrfs, Linux’s perpetually half-finished filesystem

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We don't recommend allowing btrfs to directly manage a complex array of disks—floppy or otherwise.

Enlarge / We don't recommend allowing btrfs to directly manage a complex array of disks—floppy or otherwise. (credit: Faustino Carmona Guerrero via Getty Images)

Btrfs—short for "B-Tree File System" and frequently pronounced "butter" or "butter eff ess"—is the most advanced filesystem present in the mainline Linux kernel. In some ways, btrfs simply seeks to supplant ext4, the default filesystem for most Linux distributions. But btrfs also aims to provide next-gen features that break the simple "filesystem" mold, combining the functionality of a RAID array manager, a volume manager, and more.

We have good news and bad news about this. First, btrfs is a perfectly cromulent single-disk ext4 replacement. But if you're hoping to replace ZFS—or a more complex stack built on discrete RAID management, volume management, and simple filesystem—the picture isn't quite so rosy. Although the btrfs project has fixed many of the glaring problems it launched with in 2009, other problems remain essentially unchanged 12 years later.

History

Chris Mason is the founding developer of btrfs, which he began working on in 2007 while working at Oracle. This leads many people to believe that btrfs is an Oracle project—it is not. The project belonged to Mason, not to his employer, and it remains a community project unencumbered by corporate ownership to this day. In 2009, btrfs 1.0 was accepted into the mainline Linux kernel 2.6.29.

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zipcube
4 hours ago
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